Peeran Sandhu

Peeran Sandhu Talks About Career In The Field Of Medicine

in Opinion

Peeran Sandhu is a graduate of Akademia Medyczna where he obtained his degree in 2004. His specialty is hematology as well as oncology where he has countless patients that keep him occupied. Presently, he is employed by the Tammy Walker Cancer Center but has previous affiliations with the Salina Regional Health Center. Given that his successful track record consists of 14 years of professional service, he has treated conditions that range from Leukemia all the way to Malignant Neoplasms or Multiple Myeloma. One of the procedures that Peeran Sandhu has completed more times than he can count is a bone marrow biopsy. Besides hands-on patient engagements, he also advocates for immunotherapy as the more advanced way of fighting cancer.

What made you pursue a career in the field of medicine?

As a teenager, I enjoyed learning about the human body. What always intrigued me was its ability to regenerate and overcome diseases. As you may know, of course, not everything that one might suffer from is curable or even treatable. Thus, I decided to focus on the field of Oncology because these individuals often have very serious conditions that require experimental methods.

It’s been noted that you are a supporter of immunotherapy, can you comment on that?

So, immunotherapy includes a large spectrum of treatments that aim to prevent or treat a disease based on stimulation of the immune response. For example, when you have a cold, your immune system has to fight it. Once it has done so, the antibodies which defeated the cold will remain in your body. Next time that you have that same cold, you may not even know it, or it may be overcome it faster because those antibodies are still present. With cancer, immunotherapy is a wonderful alternative to some common treatments like radiation or chemotherapy that do not always work. For instance, a lot of patients of mine that have/had Leukemia were not really responsive to those two previously-mentioned approaches. Not to mention that they have plenty negative side-effects as well.

What would you say are the most important benefits of immunotherapy?

First, immunotherapy will not target all the cells in your body as chemotherapy does. It is based on only targeting your immune system, so the potential dangers are limited to that one system of your body and not every other area that might get caught in the crossfire. Also, as mentioned, the immune system has a type of muscle memory. It will learn to fight off the cancer cells, and it may have an advantage if they were ever to come back. Thus, this approach could reduce the odds of someone having the same type of cancer in the future. Lastly, it is good to use it alongside other treatments to maximize the odds of beating the disease.

What are some other areas of medicine that you are familiar with?

Another big one is hematology. That is the study of diseases that relate to blood. In reality, it goes beyond the basic study of it and includes numerous treatments, diagnosis, and prevention methods that will help people with issues of this nature. Although I spend most of my time working with cancer patients, these two fields can easily overlap. Think of Leukemia, for example. It is basically a group of cancers that originate in the bone marrow and increase the number of white blood cells. Thus, even though it is a type of cancer, it can be viewed as a disease that detrimentally affects one’s bloodstream.

What do you hope is the first thing that comes to mind of your patients when someone mentions Peeran Sandhu to them?

I hope that all of them think of me as someone who does their best to help them in any way possible. Medicine is not a field that someone joins because they want the financial benefits or the prestige. It is certainly not the reason why I decided to practice medicine at least. Most of my weeks go above the regular hours than any other profession would require. Ultimately, I always do everything that is within my power to help those who are suffering from terrible conditions.

What advice do you have for future doctors?

Make sure that you are 100 percent sure that this career is something you can handle. That means that you must spend some time deciding if you are ready for 100-hour weeks, diseases that may not be prevented or cured, as well as many other unforeseeable issues. If you decide to go forward, know that you will have the most rewarding career in the world. There is little that compares to how fulfilled I am when people thank me for saving their life or easing their chronic pain.

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