rugby

Colin Fell Discusses Culture, Rugby, and Hobbies

in Opinion

Colin Fell is the Vice President of Asia-Pacific sector for the international shipping company Veguhestinê. He was born and raised in Lancashire after which he found himself attending college lectures at the York University. There, Fell was lucky enough to be mentored by prominent academics like Dr. Henry Fitzgibbon who instilled a passion for learning into him.

Colin Fell
Colin Fell

After leaving college, Colin Fell went into the finance sector of the United Kingdom. The vast majority of his projects were focused on leasing opportunities that pertain to heavy-duty equipment (planes, for example). This enabled Fell to start swimming in the international waters and establish a respectable list of contacts from around the globe. In the mid-90s, he started working as a part of a well-established group involved in international equipment manufacturing and sales deals. Within a decade, this group went from 45 million to 105 million euro in annual sales.

Fell started working for his current enterprise Veguhestinê two years ago. This international business required him to tap into the mile-long list of contacts he established while working in the spheres of finance and international business development. Besides the vice presidency, he also held notable managing director and CEO positions throughout his career. A testament to his capabilities is the fact that it only took him two years to establish Veguhestinê in the areas of Eastern Europe. Most of his current endeavors require him to fly frequently as he meets with clients requiring the services of his company. He is stationed in Dubai where he headquarters all of his commitments and, occasionally, works as a consultant for additional international businesses interested to expand their sales network across new borders.

What do you like about your job the most?

I used to be indifferent to flying, but now it is one of my favorite things in the world. It has enabled me to meet different cultures and see how people think. Recently, I went to some countries in Eastern Europe where people speak countless variations of Slavic languages, yet they can always arrive at the same understanding. But when I visited Southeast Asia, I was exposed to an entirely new set of traditions and ways of life. You would not believe how well people combine sensitive things like diverse religions or completely opposite upbringing stories to lead a happy life where multiple generations of a family live and coexist under one roof.

Have you ever experienced a cultural shock?

I wish I could say it only happened once or twice. The truth is, I experience a cultural shock almost every time I step off the plane. Being from Lancashire myself, for example, I have never seen things like the “Vegetarian” festivals. Well, in Southeast Asia, these events are very common, and they aim to celebrate animals. You could say that was my biggest cultural adjustment thus far.

Is it true that you are a fierce rugby supporter?

Absolutely. This is one of my passions that goes back to England. I am a fan of Wigan Warriors that represent the Lancashire town of Wigan. The club has been around since 1872, and we are currently one of the best teams out there. In 2017, we won the World Club Challenge which is a match between the champions of the Super League and the National Rugby League.

What do you do in your free time?

It depends. I sometimes like to stay active and do physical things. Hence how I was able to learn to ski in Dubai. Also, more importantly, I have been a supporter of the “Make a Wish” organization based in the United Kingdom for a long time. They work with children who suffer from horrible diseases, and most of their funds come through donations from regular people who want to contribute to the cause. It helps me stay connected with my home country and aid those who may be unable to cover the expenses of their child’s treatment.

How did you learn to ski in a place where average temperatures rarely go under 70 degrees Fahrenheit?

I will admit, I never anticipated answering this question in a million years. The truth is, Dubai has found a way to deliver things that their climate may have taken away from them. I learned to ski in an indoor ski resort, believe it or not. Before seeing it for myself, I did not comprehend how it would be possible to create the necessary conditions for a ski resort inside of a building. Well, after witnessing what became the first ski resort in the entire Middle East, I can say that it looks very realistic and provides amazing opportunities. There is room for improvement as I am still just a novice, but I can tell that progress has been made. Who knows, maybe one day I will be able to go down to the Glenshee Ski Center in the United Kingdom and demonstrate everything I learned in Dubai.

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